25 Mar 2014
March 25, 2014

2014 Airline boardbag fees

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Read this article and find out how much airlines are going to charge us for taking along our sleds to far-away destinations.

We do this as a service to you, the traveling surfer. Most of the following airlines include a surfboard as part of your regular bag allowance and let that sled fly for FREE:

  • Virgin (Europe)
  • Interjet (Mexico)
  • Qantas (Australia)
  • Singapore (Asia)
  • South Africa (duh)
  • Air New Zealand
  • Qatar Airways (New 2014)
  • Emirates (New 2014)

There are a few airlines that charge a nominal fee for your boardbag, I don’t mind paying that . . . free is better but nominal is almost as good. I have been flying Alaska to Cabo for the last few years and they charge between $50-$75 for a stuffed to the rim boardbag, thank you Alaska Airlines for keeping it real.

 

The following is the list of ‘you suck’ airlines and charge over $100 each way:

  • American
  • Continental
  • Hawaii Air
  • KLM (Reader Jeff reports 100 per board)
  • Avianca (TACA)
  • United

The following is the list of ‘dude, crazy money’ airlines and charge over $150 each way:

  • Delta
  • Iberia
  • Japan Air
  • Lufthansa
  • US Air (reader Jim says they unzipped and counted his board and charged him $150 each).
  • Northwest

The following is the  list for surfers that have ‘daddy warbucks money’. Unfortunately I’ve been caught by both Swiss Air and Thai Air personally. On Thai Air I had three boards in my bag coming back from Bali ($150 x 3) and they charged me some ridiculous tax on top of the $450. Can you imagine? I will NEVER fly Thai Air again and I hope that this list will prevent you from getting caught with your pants down.

  • Alitalia $260
  • Swiss Air $250
  • Thai Air $150 Per Board (yes, they open the bag and count)
  • United $200
  • All Nippon $300

– See more at: http://wavetribecompany.com/2014-airline-surfboard-boardbag-fee-guide-for-surfers/#sthash.2D9FD4CQ.dpuf

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